Ashtanga Yoga Primary Series

by admin on April 28, 2013

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Ashtanga Yoga Primary Series

 

The first series is also called the Ashtanga Yoga Primary Series. These classes could be conducted at a more moderate pace or provide a more balanced selection of poses than a traditional first series Ashtanga practice; but this depends upon the teacher. The entire series of poses here have to pass through the Power Yoga and Vinyasa classes.

The first series work can be approached in many ways.

The poses can either be looked at individually, or you may work on groups of asanas with their traditional Vinyasas. Then again, you may try the entire series at on go. The point is to take it easy, enjoy oneself and, over time, work more deeply into the practice.

Ashtanga Primary Series (also known as the First Series or Yoga Chikitsa), literally means yoga therapy. This is a program which, when performed regularly heals all sickness and purifies your body in preparation for deeper Yogic practice – both physical as well as meditative.

ashtanga yoga primary series

The first series class sequence goes as follows:

Surya Namaskar A

Surya Namaskar B

  1. Padangusthasana (big toe pose)
  2. Pada Hastasana (hands under feet)
  3. Trikonasana (triangle)
  4. Parivritta Trikonasana (revolved triangle)
  5. Utthita Parsvakonasana (extended side angle)
  6. Parivritta Parsvakonasana (revolved side angle)
  7. Prasarita Padottanasana (wide leg forward fold)
  8. Parsvottonasana (side intense stretch)
  9. Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana (extended hand to big toe)
  10. Ardha Baddha Padma Uttanasana (half bound lotus intense stretch)
  11. Utkatasana
  12. Virabhadrasana I (warrior)
  13. Virabhadrasana II (warrior)
  14. Dandasana (staff pose)
  15. Paschimottanasana (west intense stretch)
  16. Purvottasana (east intense stretch)
  17. Ardha Baddha Padma Paschimottanasana (half bound lotus version of paschimottanasana)
  18. Trianga Mukaikapada Paschimottanasana (1 leg folded back, forward fold)
  19. Janu Sirsasana (head to knee pose)
  20. Marichyasana
  21. Paripurna Navasana (boat)
  22. Adho Mukha Vrksasana (handstand)
  23. Bhujapidasana (arm pressure pose)
  24. Kurmasana (tortoise)
  25. Supta Kurmasana (reclining tortoise)
  26. Garbha Pindasana (embryo in the womb)
  27. Kukkutasana (rooster)
  28. Baddha Konasana (bound angle)
  29. Upavista Konasana (wide angle seated forward fold)
  30. Supta Konasana (reclining angle pose)
  31. Supta Padangustasana (reclining big toe pose)
  32. Ubhaya Padangustasana (both big toes pose)
  33. Urdvha Mukha Paschimottanasana (upward facing paschimo)
  34. Setu Bandhasana (bridge building pose)
  35. Urdvha Dhanurasana (upward bow)
  36. Paschimottanasana (intense stretch.)
  37. Savasana (corpse)
  38. Salamba Sarvangasana (Shoulderstand)
  39. Halasana (plow)
  40. Karnapidasana (ear pressure)
  41. Urdvha Padmasana (upward lotus)
  42. Pindasana in Sarvangasana (embryo)
  43. Matsyasana (fish.)
  44. Uttana Padasana (intense stretched feet or legs)
  45. Sirsasana (headstand)
  46. Balasana (child’s pose)
  47. Baddha Padmasana (bound lotus)
  48. Yogimudrasana (energetic lock or seal)
  49. Padmasana (lotus.)
  50. Tolasana (the uplifting – scales)
  51. Savasana (corpse)

Wish you happy practise!

Learn more tips if you wish to deepen your journey with ashtanga yoga teacher training here.

(Article source: yogawiz.com)
 

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